Wolfsangel by M D Lachlan

WolfsangelA review by Steve Cameron

Wolfsangel is Authon, a Viking king, leads a raid on a village. He orders his men not to kill any children, and then informs them that they will not be returning with him. His wife is unable to bear children, but the witches have prophesied that he will find a child in this village that will become his heir, and lead his people to greatness. Unfortunately he doesn’t find a single child, but twins. And so he takes them both, intending the witches to choose for him which one is the chosen child.

His son, Vali, is fostered out while Authon has no idea what happens to the other son, who is given to the berserks and raised by wolves. Neither brother is aware of the other’s existence.

Wolfsangel was a book I could not stop reading. Deep in Norse mythology, and introducing a new take on the whole Vampire mythos, I found the novel completely fascinating, beautifully written and extremely imaginative. The prose is achingly stunning at times, with passages that call out to be re-read. The use of rich language, the depth of characters and the expanse of Lachlan’s created world make for a book that must be read. Dark, moody, poetic and original, I thoroughly recommend this book to fans of fantasy, historical fiction and mythology.

An inspiring start to a brand new fantasy series.

Originally published in Dark Matter issue 5, September 2011.  This post has been pre-dated to reflect the original publication date.