Heir of Fire by Sarah J Maas

Heir of FireA review by Elizabeth Manthos

ISBN: 9781408839126
Format: Paperback, 576 pages
Imprint: Bloomsbury Childrens

Heir of Fire is the third instalment of the popular Throne of Glass series. It continues on the adventures of royal assassin Celaena Sardothian, after the violent and surprising end of the second novel.

After the savage death of her best friend, the royal assassin is out for revenge and the King of Adarlan will pay a heavy price for what he did. The answers to Celaena’s questions lie in Wendlyn and there was only way to get there. Chaol, the Captain of the King’s Guard has sacrificed his future to send Celaena there to get her answers, protect her from the king, but her darkest demons lay in the same place. If she can overcome her fears and demons, she will be Adarlan’s biggest threat — and his toughest enemy.

In Wendlyn, Celaena learns of her true destiny.

All the eyes of Erilea are on Wendlyn, including a brutal and beastly force. As they prepare to take the skies and another force on the ground, will Celaena find the strength not only to win her own battles, but to fight a war that could pit her loyalties to her own people against those she has grown to love?

With the third instalment beginning in a different place, it threw me off a bit, maybe because I read this a full year after the second novel. Heir of Fire alternates points of view almost every chapter, introducing points of view of new characters as well as old favourites. The chapters that hooked me were those of Chaol and Dorian. Chaol sacrificed so much for Celaena and has to deal with the consequences, some of which are almost dire.

We’re introduced to secondary characters from the second novel who become prominent characters in this novel as well as new characters Rowan Whitethorn, Aedion Ashryver and, of course, the witches, every single last crazy witch.

Heir of Fire flowed impressively for a novel changing points of view every chapter and I found myself wanting to read more and more about Chaol (because swoon) and Dorian and their struggles still living with the domineering and psychotic king.

All in all, my honest opinion would be filled with a lot of gushing, squealing, fangirling and swooning, but I loved this book. Actually even that would be an understatement. I need book four, yesterday!