Coreyography by Corey Feldman

CoreyographyA review by C J Dee
  • Page count: 274
  • Format: Hardcover
  • Publisher: St Martin’s Press
  • Rating: ★★★★☆ 4/5 stars

TRIGGER WARNING: Pedophilia, drug abuse

Corey Feldman has been acting since he was three-years-old and worked in movies that have gone on to become classics. Gremlins, The Goonies, Stand by Me, and The Lost Boys have made Feldman a household name since the 80s. It wasn’t until the death of his best friend, Corey Haim, that Feldman truly revealed what he and Haim had endured throughout their adolescence. This is Feldman’s story.

Coreyography explores the first hand experiences of a person forced into acting to support his family from a young age; a person who suffers a tumultuous and abusive childhood; a person whose adolescence was filled with drug abuse and sexual assault; and a person who has dragged himself out of that hell to become a loving father and dedicated advocate for protecting children in Hollywood.

Most important to remember though, is that Coreyography is about a person. Forget about celebrity, forget his name, remember that this is the story of someone’s life and it will wrench your heart.

In this reviewer’s opinion, Coreyography achieves what it sets out to achieve. It exposes the dark underbelly of Hollywood to expose the seedy, cockroach-infested area that no-one wants to talk about. It does so discreetly and doesn’t expose names that haven’t already been convicted of other felonies related to pedophilia. Feldman gives his reasons early for his discretion, explaining that if he were to name names it would only endanger him and his son as his abusers are protected by a statute of limitations and there is no solid proof to offer.

Coreyography also delves into the equally dark underbelly of Hollywood’s drug scene. Adults offering, supplying and carelessly allowing children and adolescents access to illegal drugs that get them up, wind them down, numb them and control them. It’s shocking because it’s so real.

Entwined throughout the horrific tales are some genuinely interesting Hollywood tales as experienced by Feldman. From Joel Schumacher’s volatile directing methods to Steven Spielberg’s renowned sweet nature, there were entertaining entertainment stories. While these anecdotes didn’t completely numb the effect of the heart-breaking stories, they balanced them slightly.

Coreyography manages to be simultaneously sad and inspiring, depressing and enlightening, dark and hopeful. I haven’t been so emotionally conflicted since I watched Captain Phillips.

I would recommend Coreyography for people who enjoy reading memoirs but it is not for the faint of heart. There are graphically detailed accounts of child abuse, pedophilia and drug use. Sometimes the most terrifying horror story is reality.