Search Results for: james kennedy

Work worthy of awards listed for your consideration

It’s that time again where award nominations open and people put their lists forward. I’m doing things a little differently: I’m pushing other people’s work. Eligible novels worthy of acclaim Black Sun Light My Way by Jo Spurrier published by HarperCollins is eligible and worthy for the following awards and more: Hugo Award for best novel Norma K Hemming Award (and if Black Sun doesn’t win, I’m going on…

Adam Robots by Adam Roberts

A review by James Kennedy ★★★★★ five out of five stars Adam Robots is a collection of science fiction short stories. It’s a five-star tasting menu of many different sci-fi sub-genres and it was a perfect book for a novice sci-fi reader like me because it allowed me to discover which sci-fi sub-genres I enjoyed reading the most. By far the best story in this book was ‘Thrownness’, a twist on Groundhog Day. The title,…

One Thing

Office-desk fantasy for dullard corporate brainwash victims A review by James Kennedy 240 pages, ★ Self-help is fantasy for some people and both genres serve similar purposes for the reader. Both genres stimulate our imaginations and allow us to step into the shoes of someone much more powerful than ourselves. Both genres stimulate creativity and encourage lateral thinking, and both genres are capable of conjuring up idyllic (or dystopian)…

Countdown by Alan Weisman

A review by James Kennedy Factual, optimistic tour of the Earth that spans space and time. 513 pages, ★★★★★ One bacterium is placed in a bottle at 11:00am. It divides into two bacteria every minute until the bottle is completely full of bacteria at exactly midday. The author asks two questions. One: at what point was the bottle half-full? Two: and at what time exactly did the bacteria start to realise that they were running out of space? The…

Life, Liberty and the Pursuit of Sausages by Tom Holt

a review by James Kennedy Life, Liberty and the Pursuit of Sausages takes ‘normal’ British life and makes it increasingly surreal. The story focuses on office worker Polly and her brother Don (who reminds me of the man who nearly adopted Juno’s baby in the film Juno), whose lives become punctuated by increasingly bizarre episodes. The story is set in modern-day Britain, and British references are glaringly obvious on every page. Bizarre…

Tsunami Countdown by Boyd Morrison

a review by James Kennedy Protagonist Kai Tanaka faces a once-in-a-lifetime dilemma when a mega-tsunami heads towards his home state of Hawaii. Kai is both the acting director of the Pacific Tsunami Warning Centre in Honolulu, and also a father of two typically rebellious and hormonal teenage girls. Tsunami Countdown tells the story of Kai’s struggle to save both the Hawaiian people and his own family from the wrath of the mega-tsunami. The…

2312 by Kim Stanley Robinson

a review by James Kennedy 2312 is a science fiction story of love, politics, and interplanetary terrorism. While the plot is interesting in itself, the futuristic setting in which the story takes place is definitely the book’s main selling point. This book is set in the year 2312 at a time when humans have already colonized Mars, Venus, and many asteroids and moons in our solar system. Most of them were terraformed before being settled…

Answering my critics on diversity

I was told today that I should take responsibility for promoting diversity in Victoria’s science fiction and fantasy community. Update Straight white male objected to my post commenting that only two women and one non-white male were nominated out of nine categories of Chronos Awards this year. Straight white male told me that I should do more to promote diversity in the awards. After this post listing things I did in 2013 to promote…

Disestablishment of Paradise by Phillip Mann

a review by James Kennedy The Disestablishment of Paradise is set a few hundred years in the future at a time when humans have colonised at least 150 planets. The vast majority of these planets are located outside our solar system, and a giant “fractal” network allows people, goods and letters to travel between these planets with relative ease. The setting for this story is gorgeous. The story takes place on a planet called Paradise. Paradise…

Night Guest by Fiona McFarlane

A review by James Kennedy ★★ Extremely dark and bitchy. The Night Guest is the story of a 75-year-old widow who has a government carer arrive unexpectedly to take full-time care of her. The widow sadly declines into dementia throughout the novel and becomes increasingly dependent on her carer. However, not everything is as it seems. As you progress through this book, you’ll find yourself asking yourself what’s real and what’s…