Search Results for: hugh mackay

Infidelity by Hugh Mackay

…ve been a fan of Hugh Mackay’s work long before I read any of his fiction. Hugh Mackay’s non-fiction books were my most oft-quoted resources for my social science degrees. I’ve read most of his published non-fiction and made my kids read some for high school assignments. I’ve influenced my son so successfully that when I tried to recommend Infidelity to him, he told me HE’D ALREADY READ IT and told me about Hugh Mackay appearing on Spoonman’s podc…

Selling the Dream by Hugh Mackay

…o could write well and was extremely clever and amusing — I’d say, “See if Hugh Mackay is available”.’ This is a read-in-one sitting story that was difficult to review because it’s short. I don’t want to tell you about Lincoln’s self-delusion, his affair that belongs somewhere between The Office and the Bad Sex Awards, not because of Mackay’s writing but because Lincoln is no stud; I don’t want to tell you about the wife or the subordinate whose i…

Mobile apps adverts should tell consumers what they do: seriously?!

…ven known WTF the product was that was being advertised. According to Hugh Mackay, author of Media Mania and the founder of the Mackay Report, the impact of advertising is overrated. Mackay cites the Meadowlea ‘You oughta be congratulated’ advertising campaign as one of the most successful because it reinforced existing behaviour of loyal consumers and occasional consumers; many occasional consumers became loyal. Apparently adverts intended to cha…

Saving Missy by Beth Morrey

…es of groups in the park, in a café, just like the human herd animals Hugh Mackay discusses in his sociological nonfiction. (See Mackay’s Turning Point, 1998.) Morrey’s representation of Missy feels in part loving but in part a condemnation of the older generation. We all have our regrets, just like Missy. But equally we do the best we can with what we have. There’s little to no acknowledgement of this for Missy. Morrey appears to judge Missy for…

Community vs Competition

…ars 2 as analogies In his non-fiction book Turning Point social researcher Hugh Mackay talks about Australians’ nostalgia for villages as evidenced by the village-esque look of new housing estates. People are herd animals, he says, more and more associating with cafes to be with the herd while our homes are increasingly isolated, the single-person home becoming normal. As we look for community we often find barriers, disappointments, frustrations….

Formative fiction for a disabled reader

…only did I feel seen, but it went, in my heart, next to social researcher Hugh Mackay’s nonfiction and fiction books. I already believed good science fiction is about characters, about people, about society, but Bareback included disability. But not in a bigoted way like Anne McCaffrey’s Ship stories, which left me feeling ill and nearly in tears the first time I read one. Plus Bareback’s disabled character doesn’t die at the end. Bareback vs ‘Me…

Tabitha Bird

…ce Walker The Secret Life of Bees by Sue Monk Kidd The Lost Flowers of Alice Hart by Holly Ringland Boy Swallows Universe by Trent Dalton The Geography of Friendship by Sally Piper Lost and Found by Brooke Davis A Man Called Ove by Fredrik Backman Books Nalini refers to in their discussion: Hugh Mackay’s books. All of them. Ilsa Evans’s books. Specifically Broken and her first trilogy Spin Cycle, Drip Dry and Odd Socks. If I referred to other book…

Permanent Record by Mary H Choi

…ers what is going on. I decided Permanent Record was the new Houseguest by Hugh Mackay but for the next generation. I was wrong. Pablo is so depressed that the people who care for him stage an intervention. Again and again. Still, his life goes off the rails. Permanent Record is about his struggle, his way through the myriad issues confronting him. To Cinderella or not to Cinderella? TBH I’m not overly fond of the Cinderella story. I remember read…

The City We Became by N K Jemisin

…he benefits of bone-deep multiculturalism, not merely the ‘tolerance’ that Hugh Mackay dismisses as inauthentic. However, the outworking of Jemisin’s anti-racism theme has, yet again, adversely impacted on people with albinism. By making the evil WHITE, supernaturally white, Jemisin has inadvertently excused all normative whites of guilt. The alien tentacles are white. The personification of the villain is, at first, the White Woman then the Woman…

Dark Matter’s best of 2013

…these titles have been published within the past year or so. Infidelity by Hugh Mackay insightful character study with real-world setting The Fault in Our Stars by John Green – epic teen romance reviewed here Lexicon by Max Barry – science fiction reviewed here Kinslayer by Jay Kristoff – Japanese steampunk fantasy reviewed here Small Shen by Kylie Chan and Queenie Chan – novel/graphic novel reviewed here Elizabeth Manthos’s best of 2013 Best read…